Grantee Profile

World Wildlife Fund

Grants to World Wildlife Fund

  • $1,000,000

    2017 (Duration 3 years)

    Conservation

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international conservation organization whose mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. This project aims to secure long-term ecological, institutional, social, and financial sustainability for 41 million acres of Peru’s Amazon forests by achieving effective management in 38 protected areas and establishing the enabling conditions for these areas to become financially self-sufficient within 10 years. MacArthur’s support will go directly toward achieving effective management in Peru’s Amazon protected areas and long-term financial sustainability for the country’s parks system, an objective of MacArthur’s 25-year commitment to biodiversity and ecosystem conservation in Peru. This $1 million contribution catalyzes additional investment from donors to reach $70 million total, thereby leveraging an additional $70 million commitment from the Peruvian national government, for a total of $140 million.

  • $50,000

    2017 (Duration 3 months)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international environmental organization whose mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. With partners Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) and Stanford University’s Natural Capital Project (NatCap), is organizing a regional symposium on conservation economics and natural capital in Ecuador. The symposium brings together researchers, students, government representatives, and environmental professionals in the tropical Andes for learning exchanges, training on natural capital modeling and valuation, and panel presentations. The four-day event is led by experts on natural capital approaches, with a focus on regional ecosystems and issues. Participants build skills in environmental economics and geography necessary to advance conservation in the tropical Andes.

  • $425,000

    2017 (Duration 3 years)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international conservation organization whose mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. This grant renews support for WWF’s exemplary conservation initiatives and partnerships in the Ecuador-Colombia binational Mira-Mataje River Basin, a highly biodiverse watershed in the Chocó-Darien ecoregion. WWF’s work improves landscape conservation outcomes by integrating ecosystem services and climate risk analysis into river basin management, reduces the environmental impacts of large-scale drivers of deforestation and water pollution, and strengthens environmental governance of the area by advancing multi-stakeholder forums and platforms at local, national, and binational levels. WWF coordinates this work with partners Ecolex, Altropico, and the environmental research and governance coalition led by Yachay Tech University.

  • $750,000

    2016 (Duration 2 years)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international conservation organization whose mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. With partners in the field of conservation, WWF is building on promising efforts to improve governance, financing, and national commitment to protected area systems through the development of a global strategy for “project finance for permanence” -- a mechanism for engaging all interested stakeholders in making sustainable finance and governance commitments in a single closing to durably protect networks of conservation areas. In particular, WWF is working with partners to establish criteria and priorities for applying a project finance approach while conducting hypothesis-testing in a prototype project in Colombia, which will protect more than 12 million hectares (about 10 percent of its territory). This grant tests a prototype mechanism for improving resources and governance for intact forests in protected areas and develop an actionable strategy for scaling the approach globally.

  • $550,000

    2016 (Duration 2 years)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international nongovernmental organization that works to address large global threats to species and their habitat. This award supports WWF to provide technical guidance on the management of Lake Niassa Partial Reserve. WWF works with a variety of partners to carry out this work in Mozambique, including Ministry of Land, Environment, and Rural Development and the Instituto Nacional de Investigacao Pesqueira. WWF’s community-based approach to reducing pressures on the Reserve and watershed support the health of its forests, aquatic ecosystems, and the communities that depend on them. 

  • $750,000

    2016 (Duration 3 years)

    Climate Solutions

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is a leading international global network that undertakes multi-disciplinary policy research and action in six key areas: food, climate, forests, marine, freshwater and wildlife. With people and communities at the center of interventions, WWF works at global, national and sub-national levels with diverse group of actors to define and implement innovative solutions that conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on earth. On the theme of climate, WWF works to create a climate resilient and zero carbon world, powered by renewable energy. Consistent with this mission, this project helps to establish a platform to support small and medium enterprises which have developed and piloted innovative low-carbon technologies to scale up operations to radically reduce carbon dioxide emissions and provide access to sustainable energy sources for all.

  • $343,000

    2015 (Duration 3 years)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — World Wildlife Fund is an international NGO that works to address large global threats to species and their habitat. In Madagascar, WWF’s marine program works with traditional fishers in Ambaro Bay and government authorities to manage marine and coastal resources for livelihood and biodiversity benefits. WWF is developing a fisher network in Ambaro Bay through which it is working regionally to align management interventions, facilitate collaboration and shared learning, and enable interaction between local fishermen in national fisheries management processes.

  • $3,000,000

    2014 (Duration 4 years)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — WWF will conduct research on the links between demand for commodities and agricultural expansion with tropical deforestation, overfishing, and climate change mitigation and pilot interventions to shift commodities productions towards sustainability.

  • $300,000

    2014 (Inactive Grant)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — WWF-US is a conservation organization affiliated with a global network of independent national groups. It has had a permanent presence in Colombia and executes work in field-based practice and policy in biodiversity conservation and human well-being in the context of climate change. The purpose of the grant is to upgrade planning instruments for freshwater, terrestrial and coastal marine portions of the Mira bi-national watershed, establish community conserved areas, incorporate environmental considerations to oil palm and cattle production, and promote ecosystem service compensation schemes.

  • $450,000

    2013 (Inactive Grant)

    Conservation & Sustainable Development

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is an international conservation organization whose mission is to stop the degradation of our planet's natural environment, and build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. Project staff will work with community fisheries organisations and community savings programs in the Lake Niassa Reserve to provide training in governance and financial management; initiate revenue sharing from fishing licences; improve post-harvest practices for fishers; increase access to appropriate fishing gear; and expand sustainable income-generating activities. WWF will also establish a rigorous monitoring program that tracks the ecological status of the reserve and the fisheries over time.

The MacArthur Foundation awarded World Wildlife Fund $7,618,000 between 1978 and 2017.

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