Juvenile Law Center was awarded $5,265,500 between 2003 and 2017, including 14 grants in Juvenile Justice and MacArthur Award for Creative & Effective Institutions.

$50,000

2017 • 1 month

The Juvenile Law Center (the Center) is the oldest non-profit, public interest law firm devoted to children and youth in the United States. The award enables the Center to convene criminology and behavioral researchers, law scholars, and youth justice practitioners from several nations to identify strategies for addressing and managing youthful offending through their respective legal or justice systems, as well as related issues concerning child protection. The aim is to foster a cross-national exchange on their different approaches to youth justice with the goal of learning from each other’s knowledge and experience to inform the future development and improvement of each nation’s laws, policies, and practices.

$150,000

2016 • 1 year • Juvenile Justice

The Juvenile Law Center (the Center) is one of the oldest public interest law firms devoted to children in the United States. For over a decade, the Center has been one of the leading advocates on challenges to the adult sentencing of juveniles, coordinating amicus briefs, serving as co-counsel in appellate cases, testifying before state legislatures, and most recently acting as co-counsel in Montgomery v. Louisiana, the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2016 landmark case holding Miller v. Jackson (eliminating mandatory juvenile life without parole sentences) retroactive. While there is a clear presumption in Montgomery against juvenile life without parole sentences, state courts have not consistently followed the Supreme Court’s directives. To avoid the challenges of conflicting decisions and rulings in new sentencing hearings to be held across the country, a national funders collaborative is supporting a coordinated set of activities – including legal research and analysis, policy and legal advocacy, and strategic communications - to ensure effective and consistent legal representation. To complement and strengthen the effort to ensure appropriate implementation of Montgomery, this grant enables the Center to create and disseminate a national multi-day training curricula for counsel representing individuals in re-sentencing hearings, with a particular emphasis on adolescent development and modeled on death penalty mitigation sentencing programs.

$25,000

2015 • 1 month

The Juvenile Law Center (the Center) is one of the oldest public interest law firms devoted to children in the United States. This award supports a symposium, jointly convened by the Center and Temple Law Review at Temple University School of Law, which explores the sometimes-opposing themes that practitioners, researchers and policymakers working on behalf of youth must balance. Research supports youths’ immature decision-making, impetuosity, and need for protection but it also supports empowering court-involved youth to have their voices heard, their need to be treated fairly, and their right to make certain decisions about their court cases and their lives. The symposium features several speakers who were part of the Foundation’s Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. The symposium, honoring the Center’s 40th Anniversary, builds upon the Center’s past work and provides a platform for the next stage of advocacy in the juvenile justice field.

$500,000

2013 • 1 year, 8 months • Juvenile Justice

The Juvenile Law Center is a public interest law firm that has served as the lead entity for Models for Change in Pennsylvania since the initiative was launched in 2004. The Center will use this grant to complete the work of sustaining and documenting the progress achieved in Pennsylvania; and to take part in the broader effort to export Models for Change resources and practice models to new jurisdictions.

$357,000

2012 • 1 year • Juvenile Justice

The Juvenile Law Center is one of the nation’s oldest public interest law firms devoted to children. For more than 35 years, it has worked to protect the rights of youth involved in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems through litigation, public advocacy, and coalition and consensus building. It has served as the lead entity for Models for Change in Pennsylvania since the initiative was launched in 2004. It will use this grant to ensure that progress made under the initiative is sustained and to document its results.

$250,000

2010 • 1 year • Juvenile Justice

To support training and technical assistance to Models for Change states working to improve information sharing across child- and family-serving agencies.

$350,000

2010 • 1 year • Juvenile Justice

In support of activities as lead entity in Pennsylvania Models for Change.

$840,000

2008 • 2 years • Juvenile Justice

In support of activities as the lead entity for the Pennsylvania Models for Change initiative (over two years).

$500,000

2008 • 1 year • MacArthur Award for Creative & Effective Institutions

In support of general operations.

$248,500

2007 • 1 year • Juvenile Justice

In support of a project on information sharing to support the Models for Change initiative.

Stay Informed
Sign up for periodic news updates and event invitations. Check out our social media content in one place, or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and LinkedIn.