Fellowship Brings Senior Scientists to the State Department to Provide Expertise to Diplomats and Policymakers on Policy Issues

At a ceremony at the U.S. Department of State on Wednesday, May 26, Secretary of State Colin Powell announced the first class of the Jefferson Science Fellows, senior scientists who will work alongside diplomats and policymakers at the State Department on international problems at the intersection of science and security.

Speaking to a group of 150 leaders from the scientific, university and diplomatic communities, Secretary Powell recognized the contributions of the nations top scientists to national and international security and introduced the inaugural class of Jefferson Science Fellows, who include:

  • Julian Adams, Professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan
  • Bruce Averill, Distinguished University Professor of Chemistry, University of Toledo
  • Melba Crawford, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin
  • David Eastmond, Professor of Cell Biology, University of California, Riverside
  • Kalidas Shetty, Associate Professor of Food Science, University of Massachusetts

Other speakers at the ceremony included George Atkinson, the Science and Technology Advisor to Secretary Powell and one of the architects of the new program; Jonathan Fanton, President of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Vartan Gregorian, President of the Carnegie Corporation; and Nils Hasselmo, President of the Association of American Universities.

The Jefferson Science Fellows will join the State Department for one-year assignments in Washington, D.C. or at U.S. embassies and missions abroad.  After their service, they will return to their academic careers, but will remain available to the U.S. government as expert consultants for short-term projects for five additional years.  Participating universities will provide financial and institutional support.  The program will be administered by the National Academy of Sciences.  The first three years of the Fellowship Program are supported through grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation.

International Peace & Security