Most species at greatest risk from climate change are not currently conservation priorities, according to a MacArthur-supported study conducted by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, is one of the largest of its kind and assesses all the world's birds, amphibians and corals. It drew on the work of more than 100 scientists over a five-year period. It found up to 83 percent of birds, 66 percent of amphibians and 70 percent of corals identified as vulnerable to climate change are currently considered threatened with extinction on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and are therefore receiving little conservation attention.

Conservation & Sustainable Development, Conservation