Grant Search

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

Middlebury, Vermont
www.middlebury.edu

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey was awarded $8,364,636 between 2010 and 2018, including 16 grants in International Peace & Security and Nuclear Challenges.

$2,595,000

2018 • 3 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, engagement, and dissemination. This award provides flexible support for Monterey’s nuclear-focused programming. It enables Monterey to maintain its program of cultivating promising young nuclear experts and conducting analysis and outreach activities on a variety of nuclear policy issues. The intended outcome of this award is to enable Monterey experts to respond more effectively to the rapidly changing nuclear policy environment.

$40,636

2018 • 7 months

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, and dissemination. With MacArthur support MIIS experts also hold a workshop that examines the implications of Saudi Arabia’s policy choices related to the development of civilian nuclear power. MIIS experts also conduct briefings with relevant interlocutors in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East. The intended outcome of this award is to educate policy makers and increase the quality of policy discussions on this issue.

$630,000

2017 • 2 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, and dissemination of timely analyses. This award renews work on practical measures to reduce nuclear risks through U.S.–Russian dialogue and policy-oriented research. It involves track 1.5 meetings between representatives from each country and the development and dissemination of policy recommendations. The award aims to maintain a forum for constructive engagement during a tense period between Moscow and Washington, and to identify areas of possible collaboration on topics of mutual concern.

$100,000

2017 • 2 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, and dissemination. This project, in collaboration with experts at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, explores the potential nuclear consequences of rapid geopolitical and technological change in Europe and North East Asia. It builds upon a previous project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace that assessed the proliferation implications of additive manufacturing (AM). The intended outcomes of this project are to assess the strategic implications of the decline of civilian nuclear energy in Europe and East Asia, and explore how AM might be used for nuclear weapons programs.

$174,000

2017 • 1 year, 3 months • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, and dissemination. This project aims to leverage already-enacted mechanisms (such as the Iran deal and U.S.-led bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements) to produce a series of legal and institutional recommendations that are designed to advance a global norm against plutonium reprocessing. The award’s goal is to lay the groundwork to cap and ultimately diminish global stockpiles of separated plutonium that can be used to produce nuclear weapons or improvised nuclear devices.

$430,000

2016 • 2 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation through research, training, and dissemination. CNS proposes practical steps to control and eliminate weapons-useable material through a multifaceted approach. It employs new open source digital tools to monitor the production of weapons-useable material. Also, it convenes key stakeholders from past efforts to eliminate military stockpiles of weapons-useable material, in an effort to apply lessons learned to current debates on this topic. Lastly, CNS experts assess the current state of play in international arms control politics in order to generate specific recommendations that may gain broad support on control and elimination of weapons-useable material. The intended outcome of this award is to reduce the dangers posed by the production and stockpiling of weapons-useable material.

$500,000

2016 • 2 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing proliferation of weapons of mass destruction through research, training nonproliferation specialists, and disseminating information and analysis. As one of Nuclear Challenges’ five education and training grantees, CNS provides advanced interdisciplinary training for Monterey Institute students and foreign government officials that employs cutting edge pedagogical tools. This award aims to build the capacity of graduate students and foreign government officials to make informed decisions in the nuclear risk field, which could foster better international cooperation.

$600,000

2015 • 2 years, 4 months • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) is a nongovernmental organization devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation by research, training nonproliferation specialists, and disseminating information and analysis. CNS conducts a joint research project with Russian experts on strengthening U.S.-Russian nonproliferation cooperation, including young experts so the current limits on official contact do not result in a generation of U.S. and Russian officials who are unfamiliar with each other. This award extends work beginning through a recent award to CNS by providing a comprehensive platform for continued cooperation.

$630,000

2015 • 3 years • Nuclear Challenges

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of
International Studies at Middlebury College is a nongovernmental organization devoted to
reducing nuclear proliferation by research, training nonproliferation specialists, and
disseminating information and analysis. The project aims to strengthen nuclear nonproliferation
and reduce nuclear risks through a program of United States-Russian dialogue and policyoriented
research. The project intends to raise awareness of the importance of U.S.-Russian
collaboration on nuclear matters and provide concrete recommendations to enhance nuclear
nonproliferation. It includes regular joint meetings of experts, as well as government officials
from the U.S. and Russia where possible; joint preparation by U.S. and Russian researchers of
policy briefs for the two countries’ decisionmakers; and the publication of joint articles targeting
a broad audience in major media outlets.

$465,000

2014 • 2 years, 4 months • International Peace & Security

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) is a nongovernmental organization located at Middlebury College’s graduate school, The Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS). CNS is devoted to reducing nuclear proliferation by research, training nonproliferation specialists, and disseminating information and analysis. This grant renews a grant that examined illicit nuclear trafficking networks and industry’s role in preventing proliferation. It will also examine the extent and nature of the on-going use of illicitly procured nuclear-relevant goods and explore the possibility of creating an enhanced international framework to address this quandary.

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