Overview

MacArthur’s How Housing Matters to Families and Communities initiative explores the notion that stable, quality housing may be an essential “platform” that promotes positive outcomes in education, employment, and physical and mental health, among other areas.

To that end, the foundation embarked on a five-year, $25 million research investment, which included support for a research network and 42 individual studies. As that research is published, MacArthur is producing a series of briefs to capture the essential findings and insights of each study and present them in an accessible way to help inform policy discussions on a range of topics.

Affordable Housing Is Associated with Greater Spending on Child Enrichment and Stronger Cognitive Development

July 2014

This brief builds on the growing understanding that affordable housing, via the additional income it provides families to invest in their children, has a strong connection to children’s cognitive development.

Grantee: Johns Hopkins University
Principal investigators:
 Sandra J. Newman, C. Scott Holupka

 

Housing and Cardiovascular Disease Among Latinos

July 2014

This brief examines differences in cardiovascular disease among low-income Latinos living in government-subsidized housing in the Bronx, with results showing that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is significantly higher among public housing residents than Section 8 voucher holders and low-income Latinos in general.

Grantee: Yeshiva University
Principal investigators:
 Earle Chambers, Emily Rosenbaum

 

Homelessness Is Important But Not a Determining Factor in Children’s Healthy Development

April 2014

Children in families who were homeless or doubled up were more likely to have certain behavioral problems at age three and five and to use the emergency room for health care than more stably housed, yet equally poor children. However, this study finds it was not homelessness that was the reason for the distinctions. Several other factors, such as mothers’ education, health, and immigrant status, were more important determining factors.

Grantee: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, School of Social Work
Principal investigators:
 Jung Min Park, Angela Fertig, and Paul Allison

 

Housing Assistance Programs Provide Limited Access to Higher-Performing Schools

April 2014

Families receiving housing assistance generally live near an elementary school that ranks quite low on state test scores and has a high share of students who are poor. Among the four housing subsidies examined in this study, the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program performed the best in locating families near better performing schools.

Grantee: New York University
Principal investigators:
 Ingrid Gould Ellen, Amy Schwartz, and Keren Mertens Horn

 

Housing Choice Vouchers Are Not Reaching Higher-Performing Schools

April 2014

This brief examines whether Housing Choice Vouchers can help break the cycle of poverty by allowing families to move nearer to higher-performing schools. Results suggest families still face constraints in doing so.

Grantee: New York University
Principal investigators:
 Keren Mertens Horn, Ingrid Gould Ellen, and Amy Ellen Schwartz

 

With Time, Housing Choice Vouchers Contribute to Slightly Better Work Prospects for Disadvantaged Families

April 2014

This brief examines the five-year effects—a longer timespan than most studies—of Housing Choice vouchers on neighborhood quality, earnings, and work effort. Over time, residents moved to higher-quality neighborhoods, although the number of hours worked and income earned initially declined following a move. Both work and earnings, however, rebounded after five years. Racial minorities and younger adults tended to see better results than voucher recipients who were white or older, respectively.

Grantee: University of Wisconsin - Madison
Principal investigators:
Deven Carlson, Robert Haveman, Tom Kaplan, and Barbara Wolfe

 

Poor Black Women Are Evicted at Alarming Rates, Setting Off a Chain of Hardship

April 2014

Low-income women are evicted at much higher rates than men. The reasons are varied, including lower wages and children, but one rarely discussed reason is the gender dynamics between largely male landlords and female tenants. This brief, based on an in-depth look at evictions in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, finds that women’s non-confrontational approach with landlords and their tendency to dodge the issue are two reasons why women from black neighborhoods in Milwaukee represented only 9.6 percent of the population, but 30 percent of the evictions.

Grantee: Harvard University
Principal investigator: 
Matthew Desmond

 

How Neighborhoods Affect Health, Well-being, and Young People’s Futures

April 2014

Among the many potential factors reviewed in this brief, the evidence most consistently points to neighborhood social cohesion, informal social control, spatial mismatch, and exposure to environmental hazards, including violence, as important factors in how neighborhood affects personal outcomes.

Grantee: Wayne State University
Principal investigator:
George C. Galster

 

Moving to More Affluent Neighborhoods Improves Health and Happiness Over the Long Term among the Poor

April 2014

Ten to fifteen years after low-income, inner-city families were given vouchers to move to lower-poverty neighborhoods as part of the Moving to Opportunity program, the results show that while health and happiness improved after the move, employment and children’s schooling outcomes did not. The results explored in this brief suggest that housing mobility policies alone are not a panacea for the complicated problems low-income families face.

Grantee: Northwestern University
Principal investigators:
Jens Ludwig, Greg Duncan, Lisa Gennetian, Lawrence Katz, Ronald Kessler, and Lisa Sanbonmatsu

 

Inclusionary Zoning Can Bring Poor Families Closer to Good Schools

April 2014

This brief examines how inclusionary zoning—which provides incentives for housing developers to build affordable homes in high-cost neighborhoods—can be an effective tool in helping low-income families move closer to better schools and into higher-income neighborhoods. Several features, however, could improve their reach.

Grantee: RAND
Principal investigators:
Heather L. Schwartz, Liisa Ecola, Kristin J. Leuschner, and Aaron Kofner

 

Does Living Along a Busy Highway Increase Premature Births?

April 2014

Reducing traffic congestion with open-road tolling limits pollution and contributes to better infant health—and saves $440 million in health care costs, according to this brief. Among families living within 2 kilometers of expressway tollbooths, premature births fell by between 6.7 percent and 9.2 percent after the installation of E-Z Pass tolling systems. The incidence of low birth weight fell by between 8.5 percent and 11.3 percent.

Grantee: Columbia University
Principal investigators: Janet Currie and Reed Walker

 

Poor Housing Is Tied to Children’s Emotional and Behavioral Problems

August 2013

The brief examines how housing quality and housing stability matter to children’s well-being. Living in unsafe or unsanitary homes is related to greater emotional and behavioral problems among children and adolescents, and poor housing quality is also related to poorer school performance for older children. Moving frequently is also detrimental to children’s well-being. In contrast, unaffordability had little discernible link to children’s well-being. Much of the effect of poor quality and unstable housing on children was a function of parenting. The strain of living in poor-quality homes or of having to move frequently took its toll on parents, leading to symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Grantee: Boston College
Principal investigators: Rebekah Levine Coley, Tama Leventhal, Alicia Doyle Lynch, and Melissa Kull

 

Housing, How Housing Matters, Housing, Research