MacArthur's conservation and sustainable development grantmaking has three geographic focus regions: the Great Lakes of East Central Africa, the Greater Mekong and its headwaters, and Watersheds of the Andes. Each is a place of high biodiversity, important freshwater service, and carbon-storage value. The Foundation also supports a cross-regional coastal marine program in Melanesia, The Western Indian Ocean, Indonesia, and The Caribbean focused on expanding local management of near shore fisheries in order to slow the loss of marine biodiversity.

And, MacArthur will make policy-related grants to target biodiversity conservation at the global scale and reinforce the priorities of our regional work.

Request a copy of the full CSD grantmaking strategy.

To learn more about the program priorities, please select from the below list:

 

Great Lakes of East and Central Africa

The Great Lakes of East and Central Africa is one of the most important yet ecologically threatened regions on the continent. As the source of the Nile, it supplies food, energy, drinking water, crop irrigation, and transport for nearly 300 million people. Within the next 25 years, that population is expected to double, further burdening a water supply that is already threatened by climate change, growth of industry and agriculture, and constant droughts. Grantmaking will focus on conserving the region's biodiversity and fresh water supply while addressing regional food security challenges.

Grantmaking in this region is defined geographically by the Watersheds of the Large Rift Valley Lakes, River Nile Basin, and Region-wide Grantmaking. Grants are made on a three-year recurring cycle, with one portfolio of grants prepared annually for each geography.

2012 Guidelines for the Great Lakes Region-wide

2013 Guidelines for the Watersheds of the Large Rift Valley Lakes

2014 Guidelines for the Lake Victoria Watershed

 

Download detailed map
1.34MB

Greater Mekong and its Headwaters

 

The Greater Mekong, which includes areas of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and China, is undergoing a massive infrastructure transformation that could have a lasting impact on its biodiversity and the health and well-being of local economies and populations.  Hydropower dams are being built to keep pace with the region’s growing energy consumption, while new roads, rails and ports are being constructed and expanded to manage the transport of agriculture products for export.

Grantmaking in this region is defined geographically by the Upper Mekong Basin, Lower Mekong Basin, and Region-wide. Grants are made on a three-year recurring cycle, with one portfolio of grants prepared annually for each geography.

Grantmaking in this region will focus on optimizing the hydropower supply and managing the Basin’s freshwater ecosystems essential for agricultural production and fisheries.

2012 Guidelines for the Lower Mekong

2013 Guidelines for the Upper Mekong

 

Download detailed map
2.54MB

 

Watersheds of the Andes

The Tropical Andes has been called the "global epicenter of biodiversity," and is recognized as one of the richest genetic reservoirs on the planet. Representing 50 percent of the remaining tropical forest in the world, it plays a critical role in mitigating the impact of climate change. But it is also threatened by mineral and energy mining, logging, and industrial agriculture, which contribute to its 7 percent deforestation rate, the highest in the world. MacArthur's grantmaking in this region will focus on helping to balance the needs of rural and vulnerable communities with the prudent stewardship of diverse ecosystems.

Grantmaking in this region is defined geographically by the Northern Andes, Southern Andes, and Region-wide. Grants are made on a three-year recurring cycle, with one portfolio of grants prepared annually for each geography.

2014 Guidelines for Northern Andes (English Version)

2014 Guidelines for Northern Andes (Spanish Version)

 

Download detailed map
1.28MB

 

Coastal Marine in the Caribbean, Indonesia, Madagascar, and Melanesia

Nearly half of the planet’s people live within 200 kilometers of the coastline. 30 million people in coastal and island communities are reliant on coral reefs for food, income, and livelihood. Human use of coastal systems is often managed ineffectively, compromising many of the ecosystem services crucial to the well-being of coastal economies and peoples. Unsustainable nearshore fishing is one of the most pervasive drivers of marine biodiversity loss globally. MacArthur's coastal marine grantmaking supports expanding the application of effective local fisheries management approaches within and beyond Melanesia, The Western Indian Ocean, Indonesia, and The Caribbean. This grantmaking is designed to slow the decline of coastal ecosystem services from fisheries, reduce pressure on areas of high biodiversity, and improve coastal social-ecological resilience to climate change impacts.

Coastal-marine grantmaking is defined geographically by Melanesia, The Western Indian Ocean, Indonesia, The Caribbean, and Regionwide/Cross-regional. Grants are made on a three-year recurring cycle, with one portfolio of grants prepared annually for each geography. Inquiries for this area of grantmaking are accepted by invitation only.

2013 Guidelines for Coastal Marine

 

Cross-Cutting Global Issues

In addition to our grantmaking at the regional level, MacArthur also will provide support to address a select set of global challenges to biodiversity conservation, including:

  • climate change mitigation and adaption;
  • the role of China in global conservation;
  • reducing the impact of commodity production;
  • responding to marine overfishing;

Global Policy grantmaking guidelines are currently being developed.

Conservation & Sustainable Development, Africa, Asia, Conservation, Latin America