Grantee Profile

Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation

Grants to Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation

  • $175,000Active Strategy

    2014 (Duration 1 year)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — The Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) is Stanford University's hub for researchers tackling some of the world's most pressing security and international cooperation problems. This grant would provide one year of support for CISAC's Project on Peace and Cooperation in the Asian-Pacific Region. The project addresses inadequacies of the existing security architecture within Northeast Asia by focusing on two areas where dialogues could help increase transparency and mutual understanding: U.S.-China nuclear and military strategy, confidence-building between the U.S. and China in the West Sea (west of Korea).

  • $150,000Active Strategy

    2013 (Duration 1 year)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — Founded more than 20 years ago, the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) is Stanford University's hub for researchers tackling some of the world's pressing security and international cooperation problems. This project will conduct original research on public attitudes toward nuclear weapons use, in the U.S., Israel, and India, with the aim of encouraging prudent policy choices regarding nuclear weapons employment doctrine and declaratory policy. Funds would be used for the development and delivery of these surveys, policy outreach briefings, partial research salary support, and travel.

  • $175,000Active Strategy

    2012 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — The Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) is Stanford University's hub for researchers tackling some of the world's most pressing security and international cooperation problems. This grant would provide support for CISAC's Project on Peace and Cooperation in the Asian-Pacific Region, which employs a Track II approach to focus on nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation as a means to ease regional conflicts. This grant fits with our support for Track II work that aims to resolve major conflicts or disputes between states through unofficial communications. Funds will be used for partial staff salaries, travel, meetings, and exchanges.

  • $2,000,000Active Strategy

    2011 (Duration 4 years)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — To train the next generation of experts in the field of nuclear security policy (over four years).

  • $550,000Active Strategy

    2009 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — To support the Peace and Cooperation in the Asian-Pacific Region project (over three years).

  • $300,000Active Strategy

    2008 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — In support of a policy research project entitled "The Road to Disarmament: Rethinking the Roles of Deterrence, Enforcement and Defense" (over 18 months).

  • $125,000Active Strategy

    2008 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — In support of work on Northeast Asian security.

  • $431,441Active Strategy

    2007 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — In support of work on Northeast and South Asian security (over two years).

  • $707,527Active Strategy

    2006 (Inactive Grant)

    None

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — In support of the exploration of preventive defense initiatives and unofficial dialogues with Chinese and North Korean experts (over three years).

  • $2,034,231Active Strategy

    2006 (Inactive Grant)

    International Peace & Security

    STANFORD, CALIFORNIA — In support of research, training and collaboration with independent analysts worldwide on issues at the intersection of science, technology and security (over five years).

The MacArthur Foundation awarded Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation $6,648,199 between 2003 and 2014.

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