Grantee Profile

Housing Assistance Council

Grants to Housing Assistance Council

  • $150,000Active Strategy

    2013 (Duration 2 years)

    Housing

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Housing Assistance Council, one of nation's oldest rural housing lenders, is the leading advocate for rental housing preservation in rural communities. Almost two million rural renter households have incomes below the poverty level, yet there are fewer than one million government-subsidized rural rental units. Because the Federal government supports rural affordable housing through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agency and its partners must be engaged directly. With this grant, the Council will continue to provide technical assistance, policy analysis, and education to policymakers and practitioners striving to preserve affordable rental housing across rural America.

  • $300,000Active Strategy

    2010 (Inactive Grant)

    Housing

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — In support of general operations (over three years).

  • $100,000Active Strategy

    2008 (Inactive Grant)

    Housing

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — In support of general operations.

  • $300,000Active Strategy

    2005 (Inactive Grant)

    Housing

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — In support of general operations (over three years).

  • $250,000Active Strategy

    2004 (Inactive Grant)

    Housing

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — In support of policy work, technical assistance, and research to preserve rural rental housing (over two years).

The MacArthur Foundation awarded Housing Assistance Council $1,100,000 between 2003 and 2014.

Related News

See All

Window of Opportunity Investment Summary

The MacArthur Foundation is investing $150 million to preserve and improve affordable rental homes across the U.S. More

"Vision, Will and Partnership: Charting a New Course for U.S. Housing Policy," Remarks by Jonathan Fanton at the Window of Opportunity National Policy Forum

MacArthur President Jonathan Fanton discusses ways in which policy choices might help reduce the loss of affordable housing to zero by 2020. More