Grantee Profile

Harvard University School of Public Health

Grants to Harvard University School of Public Health

  • $275,000Active Strategy

    2012 (Duration 3 years)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — The World Health Organization has developed a "Safe Childbirth Checklist" which has been tested in nine countries and is being rigorously studied in India. The pilot study results have led actors in a wide variety of countries to express interest in adapting the tools to their own settings, but they need support to do so properly. This project will allow the development of a team and a web-based platform aimed at assisting the roll-out of checklists in new locations. The project will ensure the documentation, compilation, and analysis of maternal health checklist approaches.

  • $225,000Active Strategy

    2012 (Duration 2 years)

    Migration

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — To support a project titled, The Economics of Immigration: A Reassessment (over two years).

  • $300,000Active Strategy

    2012 (Duration 2 years)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — The Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) was established in 2008 to serve as a maternal health research and information clearinghouse, an innovation and technology incubator, a catalyst for bringing new voices to the field, and a neutral convening space for organizations. The MHTF contributes to building a stronger evidence base for maternal health, greater consensus in the field, new thinking and approaches that will move the field forward, and improvements in coordination and collaboration. In its first iteration, the Maternal Health Task Force was housed at EngenderHealth, an NGO in New York City. In its second phase, it will have a home at the Harvard School of Public Health and will focus primarily on India, Nigeria, and Ethiopia. This grant will support adding Mexico as a priority country; contributing to a small grants fund for innovative maternal health projects; adding morbidities to their areas of interest; and convening experts to strategize about how to ensure that maternal and reproductive health remain on the post-2015 development agenda.

  • $1,200,000Active Strategy

    2010 (Inactive Grant)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — To develop and apply a maternal morbidity and mortality policy model (over three years).

  • $400,000

    2007 (Inactive Grant)

    Policy Research

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — In support of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (over two years).

  • $500,000Active Strategy

    2007 (Inactive Grant)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — In support of the development and application of a maternal morbidity and mortality policy model (over two years).

  • $125,000Active Strategy

    2005 (Inactive Grant)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — In support of research activities on the links among reproductive health, demographic outcomes, and aggregate economic performance (over 19 months).

  • $220,000Active Strategy

    2004 (Inactive Grant)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — For the development of a global maternal mortality and morbidity policy model.

  • $110,000Active Strategy

    2003 (Inactive Grant)

    Population & Reproductive Health

    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — In support of research on the links among reproductive health, demographic outcomes, individual and household income, and aggregate economic performance.

The MacArthur Foundation awarded Harvard University School of Public Health $3,355,000 between 2003 and 2014.

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